Fabrizio Fiorani

Pastry Chef at BVLGARI Hotels & Resorts (Tokyo, Japan)

 

Fabrizio-FIORANI_2.jpg                          Roman Pastry Chef Fabrizio Fiorani got his start in the industry at 14, working at one of the city’s artisan gelato shops. He quickly traded in scoops for work in some of Italy’s Michelin-starred restaurants: La Posta Vecchia on the coast in Lazio (one star) , Tuscany’s Il Pellicano (two stars), and Enoteca Pinchiori in Firenze (three stars). Back home in Rome, Fiorani earned the title of as pastry sous chef at three-star La Pergola. In 2013, as La Pergola expanded, Fiorani was tapped to to help open projects in Palm Jumeirah, Dubai; the Algarve in Portugal; and finally Tokyo. Finding opportunity in Japan, he seized the pastry chef position at Bulgari Hotels & Resorts in Tokyo and Osaka. In his city-spanning role, Fiorani is charged with creating desserts for Il Ristorante Luca Fantin, Il Bar, and Il Café. He also develops retail products for Bulgari’s Il Cioccolato shops, as well as department stores located in Tokyo and Osaka—bringing an Italian perspective to a heavily French-influenced pastry scene. Still passionate about ice cream, Fiorani’s plated dessert at this year’s Valrhona C3 will likely reflect his humble beginnings, and rise, in the pastry profession. 
           

 

INTERVIEW WITH FABRIZO FIORANI


VALRHONA: Tell us about your pastry style? Who or what are your biggest influences?
My pastry style is a mix of the rich taste of high quality ingredients, the technique that should give an idea of uniqueness to my desserts, and the continuous research for ingredients and new techniques in order to give an amazing experience to those who taste my dessert. To achieve this all, of course, my strong interest in traditional French and Italian pastries is at the base, and I have been fascinated by traditional Japanese pastry for the past two years.

VALRHONA: What’s your favorite dessert that you’ve ever made?
There are two desserts which I am very proud of. The first one is the ‘Lampone 1.1’ that consists of eleven different textures of raspberry, which requires great technique. The second one I made here in Japan, a really good dessert called ‘Latte,’ which means ‘milk’ in Italian. For this dessert, I used amazing raw milk from Hokkaido, and I expressed the typical flavor that each one of us has in our memory.

VALRHONA: What was your first job in pastry? 
When I was 14, I started working at an ice cream shop during the summer. Since then, the passion for ice cream has remained in my heart, and now all the desserts that I prepare have an ice cream component.

VALRHONA: Who are some of your mentors? What have you learned from them?
When I worked in two of the best European restaurants—La Pergola in Rome and Enoteca Pinchiori in Florence—the experiences I had were very important for my professional and human development, respectively. Another person that I really respect is Emanuele Forcone, a good friend of mine and a good person, who has outstanding pastry techniques. Here in Japan, I get very important advice from Norihiko Terai; all of his products, especially his cakes, are outstanding, and he’s also a great person and good friend of mine. Daisuke Tomita also advises me. He is a very talented pastry chef in Nagoya and one of the best pastry chefs in chocolate and sugar creations. Now, Luca Fantin, the executive chef of BVLGARI, Tokyo, has been a friend for 10 years, and every single day we continuously exchange our ideas to give our customers the best dessert experience.

VALRHONA: What is your planned training regimen for the competition? 
Even now I put three slots in my weekly schedule to make everything necessary to obtain the best result for this competition.

VALRHONA: What’s your most important kitchen rule?
The most important things to remember while working in the kitchen are cleanliness, organization, and perfect coordination during mise en place and service.

VALRHONA: How do you feel about representing your country at the International Finale of the Valrhona C3?
For me, this competition is very special because I represent the region where I live and where I am developing the best of my pastry ability. Also, I’m very proud of my Italian heritage. This great opportunity makes me proud of both things.

VALRHONA: Why do you think you are the potential winner?
I think I am the first one that has to believe in myself that the winner should be me. I believe in my capacity and I know I will try to do my best.

VALRHONA: How does the theme (the 30 years of Guanaja 70%) inspire you?
Guanaja is one of the best dark chocolates that I’ve used for last 10 years. It has really good acidity, and consistently has the same fluidity.

VALRHONA: What is your favorite quote you will try to keep in mind for the competition ?
If you have a problem, be a part of the solution.

VALRHONA: What would it mean to you to win the competition ?
Winning this competition is my goal for two reasons: first, because I represent a geographical area where I wasn’t born, but where I feel perfectly integrated and am proud of it. The second reason is because Valrhona and the signature chocolate Guanaja are a part of my professional life.

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